Bachelor spoilers 2014: Chris Harrison all but confirms who Juan Pablo picks

The Bachelor spoilers 2014 just keep coming! As we near Hometown dates, the Fantasy Suite episode and the finale itself, we can now say almost without a doubt that Reality Steve has been on-point with his information all season and is going to maintain this streak through the finale. (Yeah, yeah, he was wrong last time. We know.)

We believe he has the goods this year partially because franchise host Chris Harrison practically confirmed the Bachelor Season 18 spoilers surrounding Juan Pablo Galavis during a Feb. 19 media call!

Speaking specifically about Nikki Ferrell and Clare Crawley, Harrison told reporters, “And so it’s interesting. If they got to see that side of each other, which they will when they watch the show back. They’ll probably come to the ‘After the Final Rose’ show and say, ‘You know what? We were probably more similar than we thought.’”

Bachelor Spoilers 2014: Chris Harrison Confirms Nikki and Clare Are Juan Pablo’s Final Two…Oops!

Well, if Clare and Nikki are both present for the “After The Final Rose” filming, that means they pretty much had to have been the final two women in the competition. That’s how this thing works. All the other ladies, rejected previously during Season 18, will have their moment to cry, gripe, gossip or tell America ‘I have moved on and I’ve never been happier’ during the “Women Tell All” special that will air March 3 between Hometown/Fantasy Suite week (Feb. 24 and 25) and The Bachelor 2014 finale on March 10.

The hour-long “ATFR” special, which airs just after the finale wraps up, is only for Juan Pablo, the most recently-jilted bachelorette and the lady who actually won Juan Pablo’s heart. Or did she? Reality Steve has been saying for months Nikki is definitely the one who Juan Pablo picked on the Season 18 finale, but that there is major trouble in paradise. In a nutshell, Steve-O says home-girl is getting played.

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Heart Of Sliema

Sliema, coming from the word Sliem,meaning `peace’, was once a fishing town on the peninsula across Grand Harbor from Valletta. The town began to develop rapidly in the early 20th century as a summer resort for wealthier Valletta residents. Their elegant villas and town houses line the quiet, inland streets.

The Sliema promontory offers on one side stunning views across to Valletta and on the other, open sea views. The promenade, which runs for several kilometers from Gzira just south of Sliema to St Julian’s, is ideal for walker and joggers. There are plenty of seats along the promenade and on summer evenings the seafront becomes a sociable meeting place for locals.
The coastline has two tower fortifications: a De Redin watch tower built in the 17th century; the other was built by the British in neo-gothic style in the 1880s. Nearby Valletta with its historic attractions and corporate importance is also very close the area is considered to be most central on the island.

Sliema, once a fishing town, began to develop in the early 20th century as small resort for wealthier Valletta residents. Their elegant villas and town houses line the quieter back streets. The sea front from Gzira to St Julian’s, which offers first stunning views across to Valletta and then open horizons, is a popular meeting place and ideal for walkers and joggers.
St Julian’s and Paceville are Malta’s main nightlife areas. Picturesque St Julian’s Bay, still used by fishermen, is lined with bougainvillea-clad cafés and restaurants.

The top places to visit in Sliema are the Mediterraneo Marine Park where you can enjoy a day swimming with dolpfhins.

Teatru Salesjan:
Now, 105 years after the official opening of the theatre is redefining its identity.

The Teatru Salesjan is now operating as a cultural hub, opening its doors to new artists who need an affordable space in which to work and enhance their work. In doing so, the theatre would re-establish itself as a ‘home’, ‘school’ and ‘playground’ for creative work to flourish and for artists and audiences to become direct protagonists of culture.

Another kids friendly plays for both parents and children is the Playzone:

-A clean, unbroken play area with happy children and friendly parents. It felt almost like a social gathering of families. Language was no barrier, many different nationalities played together happily.

The Beach:

Sliema has no sand beaches, though in Malta any stretch of waterfront that gives access to the sea is termed ‘beach’. On Tower Road, in front of the Preluna Hotel, a broad expanse of large smooth sandstone rock slabs bordering the sea becomes a summer ‘beach’ with metal handrails (set into the rocks) giving safe access for bathers. Alternative swimming and sunbathing is offered by a number of seafront lidos, both on Tower Road and on the point of the peninsula, known as Qui-Si-Sana. There are neither beaches nor lidos on the Sliema Ferries/Strand side.

Find great deals on holiday accommodation in Sliema. Choose from a large inventory of self-contained holiday houses and apartments in Sliema, Malta.

Apartments in Sliema, Malta provide you with all the comforts of your home. Book your apartment in Sliema, Malta today!

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School History Trips to Unlock the History of Athens

School history trips bring students into contact with the past, showing them what their texts refer to. In Athens, where ancient monuments still stand, the distant past can be better appreciated: students can know how it felt to stand on the Akropolis beside the imposing Parthenon, or leave the city to visit the nearby Oracle at Delphi. Any school student taking History or Classics classes will benefit from visits to the great city of Athens.

The Akropolis of Athens

The most famous site in Athens is undoubtedly its Akropolis, a citadel on a rocky outcrop rising approximately 150 metres above the centre of the city. It was in use by human habitants of the region for thousands of years before the city of Athens developed and thrived in the Archaic and Classical periods. What stands on the Akropolis today dates to those periods: the Parthenon, the Propylaia, the Erechtheion, the Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus, and more.

Visiting the Akropolis of Athens on school history trips, students will first be awed by the marble steps and monumental gateway — the Propylaia — that take them onto the top of the hill. The massive structure of the Parthenon, the temple to the city’s patron goddess Athena, dominates the hilltop and draws all visitors to it. It is a staggering work of ancient architecture and the centre of Athenian celebrations in Athena’s name. Other surviving structures, such as the Erechtheion on the top of the Akropolis — with its porch held up by Caryatids — and the Theatre of Dionysos on the hill’s side, where many of the famous tragedies and comedies of ancient Athens were performed, complete this sensory introduction into the scale and shape of Athenian public life.

The nearby Akropolis Museum is an excellent next stop for students on school history trips, as it provides a wealth of material culture associated with and found on the Akropolis – from spindle whorls to statues. Elsewhere in Athens, sites such as the Temple of Olympian Zeus and Andrian’s Arch are beautiful, well-preserved monuments.

The Oracle at Delphi

Young visitors can trace the steps of many famed people in the ancient world by leaving Athens to visit the Oracle at Delphi. The Athenian tragedian Aeschylus wrote that the significance of Delphi began in prehistory with worship of Gaea, and certainly the site has long been in use, with a wealth of Mycenaean remains found there. Most of the ruins visible on the mountainside today date to the 6th century CE, including the reconstructed Temple of Athens (dedicated at Delphi in honour of the Athenians’ victory at the battle of Marathon) and the remains of the Temple of Apollo, a theatre and a stadium for the Pythian games held at the site. The rock on which the Oracle sat and prophesied is still in situ. Young learners on school history trips can stand beside it and contemplate the role of prophecy in the ancient world.

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